Online degrees are a cost-effective way of obtaining higher education, and more employers feel online degrees are just as credible as those from traditional schools. Still, distance learning is not for everyone. What are the pros and cons of obtaining a master’s degree online?

You Don’t Have to Sit in a Classroom for Hours a Day.

You don’t have to deal with the mechanics of traditional learning; there are no lectures to sit through. On the negative side, you will not have immediate access to questions and answers. Most master’s degree programs require practicum in laboratory or clinical settings, and a final exam taken in a monitored, physical classroom. That means either some residence time at a physical school or commuting.

You Can Set Your Own Schedule.

You can hold a full-time job, or care for family members, while studying. There is no penalty for finishing assignments early. That means you might finish your master’s program in less time than you might at a traditional school. The downside to this is that it involves a lot of self-discipline. According to College Express.com, time management is not easy for everyone. It is difficult to juggle a 40-hour work week with the 15 to 20 weekly study hours online programs need. Although you learn at your own pace, there are deadlines to submit papers and take exams. When you are a bit tired, no one is going to insist that you study.

Online Learning may Suit You Better.

You might be the kind of person who learns best from reading educational material and classroom interaction may be a distraction for you. If that is the case, you can still have socialization of sorts through online student forums. If, however, you need relationships with other students, then this type of learning is not for you.

Online Educations Costs Less.

Though some schools charge more per credit hour, most online tuitions are less expensive than traditional brick-and-mortar schools charge. In addition, there is no commuting cost or child care to consider, and textbooks can sometimes be downloaded. Still, you must have a good computer, high- speed Internet access, and some technical skills. Technology has a cost as well.

It is Easy to Submit Documents and Communicate with Teachers through Email.

All it takes is a click to send a question to your advisor or professor, and you don’t have to schedule appointments during his office time. For master’s degree students this is important because the programs are “looser” than undergraduate studies and require more faculty input. Using email is convenient. An article from the “North Carolina State University” website observed that email has its own problems. What happens, for instance, when the network goes down or there is a power failure?

Distance learning has many advantages, but it is not for everybody. Successful students will do careful self-assessments to decide whether they might be successful as online students.

Online degrees are a cost-effective way of obtaining higher education, and more employers feel online degrees are just as credible as those from traditional schools. Still, distance learning is not for everyone. What are the pros and cons of obtaining a master’s degree online?

You Don’t Have to Sit in a Classroom for Hours a Day.

You don’t have to deal with the mechanics of traditional learning; there are no lectures to sit through. On the negative side, you will not have immediate access to questions and answers. Most master’s degree programs require practicum in laboratory or clinical settings, and a final exam taken in a monitored, physical classroom. That means either some residence time at a physical school or commuting.

You Can Set Your Own Schedule.

You can hold a full-time job, or care for family members, while studying. There is no penalty for finishing assignments early. That means you might finish your master’s program in less time than you might at a traditional school. The downside to this is that it involves a lot of self-discipline. According to College Express.com, time management is not easy for everyone. It is difficult to juggle a 40-hour work week with the 15 to 20 weekly study hours online programs need. Although you learn at your own pace, there are deadlines to submit papers and take exams. When you are a bit tired, no one is going to insist that you study.

Online Learning may Suit You Better.

You might be the kind of person who learns best from reading educational material and classroom interaction may be a distraction for you. If that is the case, you can still have socialization of sorts through online student forums. If, however, you need relationships with other students, then this type of learning is not for you.

Online Educations Costs Less.

Though some schools charge more per credit hour, most online tuitions are less expensive than traditional brick-and-mortar schools charge. In addition, there is no commuting cost or child care to consider, and textbooks can sometimes be downloaded. Still, you must have a good computer, high- speed Internet access, and some technical skills. Technology has a cost as well.

It is Easy to Submit Documents and Communicate with Teachers through Email.

All it takes is a click to send a question to your advisor or professor, and you don’t have to schedule appointments during his office time. For master’s degree students this is important because the programs are “looser” than undergraduate studies and require more faculty input. Using email is convenient. An article from the “North Carolina State University” website observed that email has its own problems. What happens, for instance, when the network goes down or there is a power failure?

Distance learning has many advantages, but it is not for everybody. Successful students will do careful self-assessments to decide whether they might be successful as online students.