Government and legal systems are mankind’s methods of group organization and peace. Sometimes these systems work well. Sometimes though, they are as inherently and naturally flawed as their human makers. For the betterment of the future, these presenters and their words sound the call of action and change in these systems.

 

David R. Dow: Lessons From Death Row Inmates

In this lecture, veteran attorney and advocate, David R. Dow, provides an interesting notion. In taking data from all death-row inmates before execution, a pattern emerges with which one can glean a common background throughout most of the cases and persons behind them. Dow proposes employing this data to stop crime.

 

Drew Curtis: How I Beat A Patent Troll

Fark.com founder, Drew Curtis explains the growing issue of frivolous and fraudulent patent practices. Curtis provides personal stories on patent debacles involving news releases and the associated patent battles that have ensued.

 

Bryan Stevenson: We Need To Talk About An Injustice

Bryan Stevenson, founder and director of the Equal Justice Initiative, gives a stirring rendition of justice gone astray in America. Figures including Rosa Parks and Stevenson’s own grandmother are presented while making the points of social change in America.

 

Kristina Gjerde: Making Law On The High Seas

Kristina Gjerde discusses the compelling issues of waters that have no protection of law. Trash dumping, hazardous fishing operations, and other such atrocities are allowed to continue without regulation of these areas. Problems and solutions are presented.

 

Scott Fraser: Why Eyewitnesses Get It Wrong

Scott Fraser delves into the human consciousness. How are events recorded to the brain and what affects this recording of memories? Fraser applies the science to the reliance of fallible witnesses in the courtroom. Fraser is a widely esteemed forensic psychologist.

 

Shereen El Feki: HIV — How To Fight An Epidemic Of Bad Laws

Shereen El Feki is a world-renowned expert on societal culture and sociology. Here, El Feki discusses the HIV and AIDS epidemics, but with a twist. She asserts a shared responsibility for these epidemics that lies directly with government.

 

Heather Brooke: My Battle To Expose Government Corruption

There is no mixing of words or hidden undertone to be found in Heather Brooke’s lecture. The point is direct; Brooke takes aim at government accountability, freedom of information, and the need for related change. Interesting examples of government corruption are also illustrated.

 

Stephen Coleman: The Moral Dangers Of Non-Lethal Weapons

Stephen Coleman is a leading expert on applied ethics and human rights. Here, Coleman presents a thinking contrary to the popular; Non-Lethal weapons are having adverse effects. This unforeseen consequence is explained in a rather compelling manner.

 

Kiran Bedi: A Police Chief With A Difference

Kiran Bedi is one of the most influential and accomplished law enforcement officials from India. As demonstrated here, Bedi’s main goals are to educate the public and government alike on effective alternatives to the traditional “rehabilitative” methods of today’s correction system. Radically different ideas on incarceration and crime are given.

 

Marc Goodman: A Vision Of Crimes In The Future

Marc Goodman, chair at Singularity University and head of the Future Crimes Institute, reveals a foreseeable and unsavory future if change is not adopted. Goodman applies measured technological advance to human crime and presents problems as well as solutions.